Halloween 2016: Trick or Booze

Good ol’ October… the most magical time of the year for costume enthusiasts, candy enthusiasts (a.k.a everybody) and, unfortunately for 2016, creepy clowns.

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If Halloween is your thing, and you’re a booze aficionado, alcohol with a spooky slant should make an appearance during your celebrations. And if Halloween’s not your thing, booze can certainly help pass the time while you hide from trick-or-treaters.

To ramp up for the holiday, here are some tipples that will fit in perfectly with your terrifying (or, you know, sort-of scary) decorations.

1. Dawn of the Red

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Look, try not to judge, but I first tried a bottle of this because I’m a fan of puns. I tried the second bottle because I was a fan of the taste. An India Red Ale brewed in Oregon, it has citrusy hop notes and a blood orange color. Enjoy one while sporting zombie attire or being actually undead.

2. The Velvet Devil Merlot

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This Merlot from Washington State is great for the mischievous among us. Notes of dark fruit, cedar, and tobacco are great accompaniments to the $12 devil horns and tail you bought an hour before the party.

3. Dogfish Head Punkin Ale

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To be honest this list wouldn’t be complete without SOMETHING pumpkin flavored. And as an alumnus of the University of Delaware, I have a soft spot for Dogfish Head beers. But despite my bias, you should believe me and add a pack of these full-bodied brown ales to the beer fridge this year.

4. Vampire Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon

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The tagline for this wine is “sip the blood of the vine.” Enough said.

So there you have it –  some beverage suggestions for making your Halloween celebrations fearfully festive.

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